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Report from Spokane, 19th instant:
ARMED FORCES DAY LILAC PARADE
Downtown Spokane was treated to a new 'float trailer' by the Sons of the American revolution, who paraded their Colors proudly, to the tunes of fife & drum.
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Report from the Field, Bremerton WA,19th instant:
ARMED FORCES DAY PARADE
WASHINGTON SAR COLOR GUARD AND FIFE & DRUM CORPS
Compatriots (l. to r.)
ROW 1: Drum major Viren Lemmer; Jay Lemmer; Jeannine and Skip Stephan; Ken Roberts.
ROW 2: Deputy Cmdr Dick Motz; Fifer Dave Irons; Color Guard Commander Art Dolan; Dave Blevins
ROW 3: Brigade Commander Doug Nelson; Past CG Cmdr Bob O'Neal; Kent Sterling; Noah Chase.
ROW 4: Neil Vernon; Mick Hersey; Ralph Liening; Conrad Plyler.
Not pictured: Fifer Stephanie Conroy.
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UNIFORMS OF THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR
- No. 2 THE CONTINENTAL ARMY:
In April 1775, there was NO Continental Army! The American patriots had to very rapidly form an armed force. There was only the militia to defend locally, but none for the prosecution of a War in defense of the Colonies.

The organization of units was often led by the local "Committee of Safety". The men were recruited by prominent local leaders (captains and colonels) who "raised" companies of a hundred men and regiments of three to five companies. Uniforms and equipment was often supplied by the Committee or with some help from the Congress. So there was little uniformity in uniforms during 1775-1778.

The organization of units evolved into three types of units - 1) Continental Regular Army Regiments; 2) State Troops, and 3) Existing county Militia Units. This organization followed the template set forth by the British Army - OUR ENEMY! At first, some units even had red coats.

Continental units were clothed in "regimentals". Typically white small clothes (shirt, vest, breeches and stockings) and the regimental coat, usually prescribed by the colonel commanding.
In the beginning, as covered in the last essay, regimental uniform coats were made out of whatever cloth was at hand in whatever color could be had or dyed. Hats were black tricorns, adorned with a black cockade, the mark of a soldier. A tricorn without a cockade marked one as a civilian.
These pictures should give you the flavor of the variety of colors of early regimental uniforms in 1775-1777.
[Next: No. 3 - State Troops and Militia Uniforms]
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